Dec 05

Innovations in Knowledge Organisation

This is going to be fun….

image

Dec 03

In Defence of Discovery

So when we work on taxonomy and search in projects for clients, one of the most common over-simplifications we encounter (and there are many) is the assumption that the sole user problem to solve is a problem of “finding” or retrieving information against a clearly defined need. But if we pause even for a moment to consider our own working patterns, this is only one of several information scenarios. We might have an inkling of something and be looking for similar or connected things, which is where classifications help. We may not know specifically what there is to look for, we might be browsing to discover something that might be interesting or useful to our need. We might be indulging in “idle” curiosity (though I tend to think of curiosity as more active than idle).

Over at Brain Pickings, Maria Popova has a passionate piece on the Usefulness of Useless Knowledge, and how important it is to foster and support open curiosity. It reminds me of a story about Robert Falcon Scott, on one of his Antarctic expeditions. While out sledding with his team, a crevasse opened up and he fell into it. Crevasses in the melting season are dangerous, they can shift and move unpredictably. But Scott frustrated his team mates by not climbing up the rope immediately they lowered it to them. He was busy examining the inner structure of the crevasse. He wanted to see how it was structured, and observe how it behaved.

This was characteristic of Scott, his team mates later observed. He questioned everything, explored everything, even if there didn’t seem to be an immediate need or payoff for doing so. This made him extremely alert to small signals in a shifting, complex and unpredictable environment. He guessed accurately when it was unsafe to cross an ice sheet. He knew how to treat the dogs when they were uneasy. Curiosity pays off in many small ways. And when we organise our knowledge systems, we need to provide for curiosity too.

Hat tip to my colleague Ari for picking up this article.

Dec 01

Transverse Lies and the Fusion of Tacit and Explicit Knowledge

Mikhail Bulgakov spent his first couple of years (1916-1917) after graduating as a doctor in the depths of rural Russia. He wrote a number of semi-autobiographical short stories about the experience. In one of them, he is called out in the middle of the night to deal with a difficult and dangerous pregnancy, a transverse lie, in which the baby is lying horizontally with its shoulder nearest to the birth canal. His two experienced midwives looking on, Bulgakov tries to give an impression of competence, but while he aced his obstetrics paper, he knows the task of turning the baby – called a version – in the womb is hazardous, and all his book knowledge flies from him. On the pretext of getting his cigarettes while the midwives prep the mother, he rushes to his room and goes through his obstetrics textbook. Then as he scrubbed up for the procedure, his midwife “described to me how my predecessor, an experienced surgeon, had performed versions. I listened avidly to her, trying not to miss a single word. Those ten minutes told me more than everything I had read on obstetrics for my qualifying exams…”

After the procedure, which was successful, he returns to his room and starts flipping through his obstetrics manual again. “And an interesting thing happened: all the previously obscure passages became entirely comprehensible, as though they had been flooded with light; and there, at night, under the lamplight in the depth of the countryside I realised what real knowledge was.”

We sometimes think of explicit technical knowledge and tacit experiential knowledge as distinct things, because they come in different forms. In knowledge management we certainly manage them in different ways. But Bulgakov’s story reminds us of how intimately connected they are. The knowledge in the obstetrics manual is codified for reading no doubt. But it is itself a hardening and crystallisation of centuries of experiential knowledge. And getting the words into your head gets some knowledge into your head, for sure, but the experience of working with bodies is what brings that technical knowledge to fruition. What Bulgakov describes is a process of reciprocal enrichment and fusion between outer and inner knowledge, making the outer knowledge more accessible than before. So now I’m thinking, how do we manage for that kind of process?

Nov 12

ISKO UK Conference 2015 - Call for Papers

I’m honoured to be associated with the ISKO UK biennial conference on knowledge organisation. This is a small, highly focused conference, and one of the best around in bringing practical and theoretical perspectives to bear on issues and methods in knowledge organisation. They have just issued a call for papers for their 2015 conference, which will be held 13-14 July 2015. Consider putting in a proposal! See under the fold for the call for papers details.

Read more...

Nov 07

Knowledge Retention: Beyond Guidelines and Rhetoric

Shortly after my mom turned 50, she decided to retire. Soon after that, I began to notice oddities in our conversations. She would tell me things that didn’t make sense. When I pressed her for context, she seemed disoriented. She had been watching a lot of TV programmes, and I wondered if her reality had somehow been distorted because of that. It was worrying. We decided that she should go back to work. She did, and these days conversations tend to be about her peeves with her colleagues or customers. In other words, things are back to normal. 

Read more...

Oct 23

Latest Edition of Straits Knowledge Bulletin is Out

We’ve just issued our latest Bulletin, with KM reading, free articles, events and news updates http://conta.cc/1uJebpr.

Oct 15

Taxonomy Development Poster in Simplified Chinese

image

This is the Chinese version of the Taxonomy poster that Patrick shared in 2012.

To download the PDF version of the Chinese poster, click here.

I had enjoyed being part of the process of translating the original poster into Chinese. It felt like visiting an old friend. While I had studied Chinese for about 12 years there was never a need or opportunity to use it in business – until now, 22 years later.

I’d be interested to know if anyone of you finds the translated poster useful.

Sep 23

Is KM Dead? Larry Prusak, Dave Snowden, Patrick Lambe (Recorded July 2008)

In a conversation held in Kuala Lumpur on July 1st 2008, Larry Prusak, Dave Snowden and Patrick Lambe discuss the topic of whether KM is dead or dying, and what lies in store for it. Nice transcript of the conversation within timings provided by Jack Vinson at http://blog.jackvinson.com/archives/2008/07/24/dead_km_talking_sound_bites.html

Sep 22

KM Conference Season 2014 begins in Earnest

We are speaking and facilitating at a number of conferences September through November 2014, including KM Singapore (knowledge audit workshop with Edgar Tan), IIM Canberra (keynote and a knowledge audit workshop with Edgar Tan), Taxonomy Bootcamp (keynote) and KM World(knowledge audit workshop) Washington DC, and a Knowledge Audit Masterclass with Paul Corney in London. Yes – knowledge audits are the flavour of the season, as the subject of my new book, due out in 2015. Drop in and see us!

Sep 09

Narrative Based KM Competencies Framework (video was made in October 2008)

This video was made for the Cognitive Edge network as a mini-case study of using narrative techniques. It describes an iKMS (http://www.ikms.org) project to develop a self-development competencies framework for knowledge managers in Singapore. We started with anecdote circles to collect stories of knowledge manager experiences, and from them and prior research on typical KM roles the participants built archetypes. Knowledge managers susbsequently built “competency wheels” for each archetype using Dave Snowden’s ASHEN framework as a base. The research was conducted by Awie Foong for iKMS, directed and supported by Patrick Lambe, and will be published by iKMS in October 2008.

Page 1 of 65 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »